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Sep 2017+

Sheringham Sign

It's a miserable-looking one today and the traditional, seaside town vibe isn't being felt with the distinctive, Norfolk cobble walls the only highlight.

Blyth & Wright, the ironmongers, have dressed their window with a wartime display, not shown, ready for a 1940s-themed event next weekend. There's no real need for the period recreation, just step right inside and step right back in time.

I love these places, I think it's the smell, which is that of grandad's shed, and could easily spend an hour although there's often an obligation to buy a small bag of screws or some shoelaces. Today, it was a £3 umbrella.

  The Bank Restaurant (Church Street)

'We are not a Curry House, or a fast food outlet.' their website proudly claims. Most of the menu would suggest otherwise but the Nepalese section delivers something a bit different. 'Have you tried the BHUTEKO MASU?' I asked the young waiter...

'I don't like curry.' he said. You will and this pair do, three times now.

It's still hoying it doon further down the high street and there's nothing faintly amusing although, magnet or no magnet, the Tuppenny Falls do provide a bit of a distraction.

It's not much fun for the soggy buskers outside the Lobster, neither. They'd be playing here tonight and were trying to drum up some business for later. Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head, seriously, some fine work there fellas.

All of that bunting's been hung for next week's 1940s weekend although the Lobster's nods are a little more recent.

It's an annual attraction that's organised by the  North Norfolk Railway but more on that in a minute.

  The Lobster (High Street)

The pick of the pubs here, probably. Cosy interior with decent, local beers to wash down better than expected grub and a beer 'garden' with live music when in season.

Something dry needs to be found to do since all day can't be spent in the ironmongers so how about a choo-choo?

Two train stations here and this, the original, preserves and serves the chuff-chuffs. The other is the end of the line for trains to Norwich so don't get them mixed up unless, of course, you want to go to  Carrow Road.

 North Norfolk Railway run the Poppy Line between here and Holt although it takes a break in the winter.

It's not all about the steam, you might end up on a diesel but at least today they're both Superdry™. It's no more than six miles and takes about 20 minutes but be warned, it's a good mile at the other end to turn right and walk into Holt.

Today? With this weather? That's how it's known to be a good mile.

The gift shop at the station in Sheringham is an eye-opener. As the occasional collector of things of a uniform and homogeneous nature, i.e. a middle-aged man, their selection of  Middleton Press hardback publications looks to cover every mile of railway track ever laid in the UK.

Let's just start with a local one then see how things go, eh?

  Tyneside Club (Station Road)

Up by the railway and not named because the Toon are playing on a loop on Sky™ Sports in this Working Men's Club. No, it's on the site of an old doctor's house named 'Tyneside' by his wife who hailed from thereabouts and was perhaps feeling a little homesick?

She was sick? She hadn't seen today's scores...
Brighton & Hove Albion
1 Newcastle United 0.

Will this gloom never end?

Meanwhile, back in Sheringham, that rain's eased right off so let's head down to see if that seaside reputation is justified. The concrete's a bit ugly but necessary although the beach huts bring a bit of colour and there's access to the decent looking beach, not shown.

Behind the Art Deco block at the top, there's what qualifies as a hill in Norfolk

When it's said 'in Norfolk', Beeston Hill would probably pass the test anywhere and at just over 200 foot[1], there's a, not expectedly, reasonable view down to town.

It's relatively recent and by that it's meant ice age new. There used to be two of them but the sea has seen to the second and those cliffs are nearly 300-foot closer than they were 200 years ago. That'll be the reason for all that concrete and is what's being headed back down to now, it's only blummin' started to rain again!

[1] It's not the highest point in Norfolk, you'll have to head a mile and a half south-east to Beacon Hill for that.

  Mo Museum (Lifeboat Plain)

Town museum so called from the name of the new building on the seafront. So called from Morag, a young, Sheringham girl who lived in the old building on the seafront. Lifeboats and tragic tales of fisherfolk although comments should be sourced elsewhere, taking advantage of a break in that rain instead.

Back on the promenade, a prying pair of what were first thought to be plovers.

Turns out they're turnstones because that's what they do for food[1]. What about a 'chompscone' because that's what this pair are now off to do.

[1] Discarded bananas and washed-up corpses are also particular favourites, apparently.

  Little Theatre (Station Road)

Yes, it's a theatre but other events include film, art exhibitions, dance, music and comedy. They've also a café-come-bar when you're ready to chomp on a scone or sup from a schooner.

Steps up from the promenade bring you to what's believed to be called an ' esplanade' and the Burlington Hotel.

In Sheringham's heyday, this would have been one of the places to stay although advising trippers suggest it's now a little jaded.

Having snuck round the back to get back into town, just a 'little' jaded? In fact, it's so jaded, it's noticed that it's now permanently closed.

Up from the Esplanade, they've done some fine work on the war memorial, sat on a roundabout surrounded by a nicely tended garden.

 Ralph Vaughan Williams lived just off here and yes, it's become a bit of a struggle now, facts-wise. Sheringham ain't all that big, you see, and it's only a short hop back to the high street.

There's still a good week's worth around here, though, including the 1,000 acres of Sheringham Park all managed by the National Trust™, Now, there may have been a slight grudge with the 'Trust' since Dunwich Heath but this place means that fiasco has since been forgotten.

  Burlington Berties (St Nicholas Place)

Next door to where Ralph Vaughan Williams lived, apparently and not to be confused with the Burlington Hotel, see previous. It's described as 'boutique' because each of the eight rooms is individually named and 'styled', you serve yourself at breakfast and there's an honesty box for the bar.

They're a quirky, clean and friendly bunch and this was a couple of nights way better than expected.

What's happened here? There's only been some time travel but not back to the war rather forward a year when it actually is that 1940s weekend. 20,000 people will visit over the two days and boy are they buying into it.

Some people's attempts at fancy dress are better than others, though, were 'spivs' really once so common as sixpence?

Wartime or not, this place will have you wanting to come back and there's no shameless exploitation in the cafés charging 1940s prices...

£48.50 for a cream tea? Aye, sugar, tea and flour... ration rates mate!

  Sheringham Launderette (Beeston Road)

The 'Largest Duvet Machine in North Norfolk' they proudly claim so it was very tempting to go inside and ask...

'Do you  do duvets?'